The Application Gallery features COMSOL Multiphysics tutorial and demo app files pertinent to the electrical, mechanical, fluid, and chemical disciplines. You can download ready-to-use tutorial models and demo apps with step-by-step instructions for how to create them yourself. The examples in the gallery serve as a great starting point for your own simulation work.

Use the Quick Search to find tutorials and apps relevant to your area of expertise. Log in or create a COMSOL Access account that is associated with a valid COMSOL license to download the MPH-files.

Stefan Tube

This example illustrates the use of the Maxwell-Stefan diffusion model available with the Transport of Concentrated Species interface. It models multicomponent gas-phase diffusion in a Stefan tube in 1D. In this case, it is a liquid mixture of acetone and methanol that evaporates into air. The concentration profiles are modeled at steady-state and validated against experimental data by Taylor ...

Electrodeless Lamp

This model simulates an electrodeless lamp with argon/mercury chemistry. The low excitation threshold for mercury atoms means that even though the mercury is present in small concentrations, its behavior dominates. There is strong UV emission from the plasma at 185 nm and 253 nm. The UV emission can stimulate phosphors coated on the surface of the bulb. From an electrical point of view, the lamp ...

Parameterized Concrete Beam

Reinforced concrete beams are commonly used in modern construction due to their strength and durability. By simulating such beams, engineers can ensure that the resulting structures both perform well and are safe. With simulation apps, engineers of all levels of expertise can analyze and test different designs with ease. The Parameterized Concrete Beam demo app focuses on the structural ...

Natural convection in a closed cavity with mass conservation

Only fully compressible flow can guarantee the mass conservation in time in a closed cavity where the temperature increases. This is a simple proof of concept using the "gravity" option available in V5.2A.

Tank Series with Feedback Control

This example illustrates how to set up and solve a tank-in-series model in 0D using the Reaction Engineering interface. The model treats a series of three consecutive tank reactors. A feedback loop continuously adjusts the inlet concentration of the first tank to keep the concentration at the outlet of the last reactor close to a set level.

Molecular Flow Through an S-Bend

This model computes the transmission probability through an s-bend geometry using both the angular coefficient method available in the Free Molecular Flow interface and a Monte Carlo method using the Mathematical Particle Tracing interface. The computed transmission probability by the two methods is in excellent agreement with less than a 1% difference. This model requires the Particle Tracing ...

Kirsch Infinite Plate Problem

This model describes a static stress analysis to obtain the stress distribution in the vicinity of a small hole in an infinite plate. The model is a classic benchmark and is described in Mechanics of Material, by D. Roylance. The stress level is then compared with the theoretical values.

Corner Cube Retroreflector

A corner cube retroreflector can be used to reflect rays so that their reinitialized trajectories are parallel to their initial trajectories, regardless of the angle of incidence. This tutorial model shows how to simulate the reflection of a bundle of rays at a cube corner retroreflector using the Geometrical Optics interface.

Crevice Corrosion of Iron in an Acetic Acid/Sodium Acetate Solution

Mass transport limitations within thin crevices can often result in the local electrochemistry to differ significantly between the crevice opening (mouth) and end (tip), and as a result of the differences in local chemistry, corrosion may occur. This example models crevice corrosion of iron in an acetic acid/sodium acetate solution. The model reproduces the results of Walton.

Motion of Trapped Protons in Earth's Magnetic Field

This model demonstrates the path of non-relativistic protons within Earth's magnetic field. Due to the dipole nature of Earth's magnetic field, charged particles, such as electrons and protons, can get trapped in stable configurations within it for long periods of time. These configurations involve the particles rapidly bouncing from magnetic pole to magnetic pole, and drifting around the ...