Here you will find presentations given at COMSOL Conferences around the globe. The presentations explore the innovative research and products designed by your peers using COMSOL Multiphysics. Research topics span a wide array of industries and application areas, including the electrical, mechanical, fluid, and chemical disciplines. Use the Quick Search to find presentations pertaining to your application area.

Investigation of Scattering Effects in Colloidal Systems

D. M. Forrester [1],
[1] Loughborough University, Loughborough, United Kingdom

When the particles in a colloid come close to each other, multiple scattering in ultrasonic beams is no longer negligible and crowded particle effects emerge. The presence of each particle affects the scattering of all others, leading to coupling effects. We investigate the interaction of a range of sizes of particles, arranged periodically or randomly (in medium to high ultrasonic frequency ...

Modeling Nanoscale Heat Flow

S. Palaich, and B. Daly
Physics and Astronomy Department, Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, NY, USA

When the dimensions of the material approach is a comparable size to the phonon mean free path, heat flow enters a new regime, the nanoscale. The Fourier and Cattaneo Equations describe bulk heat flow well, but radiative boundary terms must be considered when modeling nanoscale heat flow. We take these equations and input them into COMSOL with the hope of eventually linking nanoscale and bulk ...

Design for Reliability and Robustness through Probabilistic Methods in COMSOL Multiphysics with OptiY

T.-Q. Pham[1], H. Neubert[2], and A. Kamusella[2]
[1]OptiY e.K., Aschaffenburg, Germany
[2]Institute of Electro-Mechanical and Electronic Design, TU Dresden, Germany

One challenge in designing micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) is considering the variability of design parameters caused by manufacturing tolerances and material properties. The function of MEMSs is significantly influenced by this variability, which can be represented in terms of statistical variables. In order to involve statistical design parameters into the design optimization process, ...

Modelling of Seismoelectric Effects

B. Kröger[1], U. Yaramanci[2], and A. Kemna[1]
[1]1 University of Bonn
[2]GGA Hannover

We present the results of full-waveform time-dependent finite-element modelling of coupled seismoelectromagnetic wave propagation in fluid-saturated porous media. To describe the seismoelectric response of the system a new set of equations is developed which couple the poroelasticity theory and Maxwell’s equations via flux/force transport equations in a thermodynamical sense. The coupling ...

Finite Element Modeling of Dielectric-Paraelectric Composite Materials

K. Zhou, S. Alpay, and S. Boggs
Institute of Material Science, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USA

Finite Element analysis is used to model 2-D and 3-D paraelectric-dielectric composites (BaTiO3 spherical fillers randomly distributed in constant dielectric matrix). The effective dielectric response and tunability are studied under different filler sizes and different volume fractions. The results are consistent with previous theoretical and experimental results: with the increasing of filler ...

Temperature Excursions at the Pulp-Dentin Junction during the Curing of Light-Activated Dental Restorations

M. Jakubinek[1,2], C. Neill[1], C. Felix[3], R. Price[2,3], M. White[1,2]

[1]Departments of Chemistry and Physics, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada
[2]Institute for Research in Materials, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada
[3]Department of Dental Clinical Sciences, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada

Heat produced during the curing of light-activated dental restorations could damage the dental pulp. Given the prevalence of composite restorations and the importance of avoiding injury to the pulp, efforts should be made to minimize the temperature increase that occurs at the pulp-dentin junction during light-curing. In this investigation we develop and evaluate a COMSOL Multiphysics FEM tooth ...

On Boundary Conditions for CSEM Finite Element Modeling, I

J. Park[1], T. Bjornara[1], H. Westerdahl[2], and E. Gonzalez[2]
[1]Norwegian Geotechnical Institute (NGI), Oslo, Norway
[2]StatoilHydro Research Center, Norway

In this study, we propose an absorbing boundary domain (or condition), which is really simple but still efficient for the 2.5D finite element (FE) analysis. The main application is to simulate the electromagnetic (EM) waves related to the marine controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) method, where the EM wave propagates with extremely low frequency in the conductive media. In the near future, ...

COMSOL in a New Tensorial Formulation of Non-Isothermal Poroelasticity

A. Mario-Cesar Suarez[1], and V. Fernando Samaniego[2]

[1]Faculty of Sciences, Michoacan University, Morelia, Mich., Mexico
[2]Faculty of Engineering, National University of Mexico, Mexico City, Mexico

The presence of a moving fluid in a porous rock modifies its mechanical response. Poroelasticity explains how the fluid inside the pores bears a portion of the total load supported by the rock. The remaining part of the load is supported by the elastic skeleton, which contains a laminar fluid coupled to the framework by equilibrium and continuity conditions. This work introduces an original ...

Modeling Interface Response in Cellular Adhesion

G. Megali[1], D. Pellicanò[1], M. Cacciola[1], F. Calarco[1], D. De Carlo[1], F. Laganà[1], and F.C. Morabito[1]

[1]DIMET Department, Faculty of Engineering, University “Mediterranea” of Reggio Calabria, Reggio Calabria, Italy

Constitutive properties of living cells are able to withstand physiological environment as well as mechanical stimuli occurring within and outside the body. We examined fluid flow and Neo-Hookean deformation related to the rolling effect. A mechanical model to describe the cellular adhesion with detachment is here proposed. We developed a finite element analysis, simulating blood cells attached ...

A Semplified Model for the Evolution of a Geothermal Field

L. Meacci[1], A. Farina[1], F. Rosso[1], I. Borsi[1], M. Ceseri[1], and A. Speranza[1]


[1]Dipartimento di Matematica U. Dini, Università degli Studi di Firenze, Firenze, Italy

The problem is to understand how a geothermal field can evolve from a water dominated state into a vapor dominated one. A first answer to this question is given by a simplified mathematical model of the dynamics of a geothermal field in which the geothermal fluid is entirely composed by pure H2O. We considered a 1-D geometry and we developed a dynamic model that presents a clear interface ...